Greetings.

Shabazz video game

tohelpstayhere:

image

We sat on the couch in the old house off North Loop and I played this for you. It was around this time, October, two years ago. It was the first house we moved in together. We’d been there probably less than a month. The days were growing darker and the air crisper and dusk had that autumn feeling of fireplaces and sitting close. The song I played for you then was very different than this one. That one was so rough sounding, emptier, more jagged, with sounds rougher and sharper than I know you like to hear, that even though I could hear what I wanted it to sound like, it wasn’t yet there but I wanted to share with you what I had been working on and was excited about. And you sat patiently with the headphones on and listened because you love me and were excited for me to be in love with the making of things. I don’t know if you liked it or not. Maybe you did, maybe you didn’t. Maybe it was too sharp on your ears, your ears which are so sensitive. Maybe in spite of your soft listening you liked it just because my fingertips were on it (just as I love to hear you play piano, even when you were self conscious and felt like you were messing up, even though all I could hear was my wife making music on a beautiful instrument). I left the song for a spell, so long that I had forgotten I had added things to it a number of months ago. Things I liked and that were unexpected. So I rerecorded the vocals and played with it some more. Made it a little bigger, a little softer, a little uglier, a little more beautiful, and put an ocean into it. The movement in the music sounded like waves to me. Or maybe I just miss the ocean. Many things I miss while out here. Your quiet and beautiful hands. I think of them, holding a book or your ankle curled against you. I think of your red coat. Here in New England, the trees are on fire but do not burn. It is lovely. 

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.
Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian
Zoom Info
nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.
Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian
Zoom Info

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.

Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian

geargent:

The Ultimate Weapon In Rubber Band Warfare
If somebody had asked you, yesterday, to name the top ten must-have items that your bachelor pad simply had to have, a rubber band machine gun probably wouldn’t have been on that list. Why? Because you didn’t know it existed. Now you’re going to regret laminating that wish-list, because your trusty Wingman is going to show you exactly why it needs changing.
Ingeniously designed and crafted by Alex Shpetniy & Brian Dinh, this fast-charging, easy-reload, 16-barrel, automatic machine gun is a certified fan favourite, with its Kickstarter campaign almost quadrupling its pledge aim of $5,000 with almost an entire month left to run.
Using a small electric engine, powered by just 5 AA batteries, whether your target is your arch nemesis or just a few cans lined up along a wall, the huge 672 rubber band capacity allows you to fire off 14 shots per second, at a range of up to 26 feet.
With plenty of time left to pledge – should you be unable to fight the desire to get your hands on one of your very own rubber band machine guns – the eleven different pledge options, and three stunning variations of gun design, should leave no home rubber-band-machine-gun-less this Christmas.
Zoom Info
geargent:

The Ultimate Weapon In Rubber Band Warfare
If somebody had asked you, yesterday, to name the top ten must-have items that your bachelor pad simply had to have, a rubber band machine gun probably wouldn’t have been on that list. Why? Because you didn’t know it existed. Now you’re going to regret laminating that wish-list, because your trusty Wingman is going to show you exactly why it needs changing.
Ingeniously designed and crafted by Alex Shpetniy & Brian Dinh, this fast-charging, easy-reload, 16-barrel, automatic machine gun is a certified fan favourite, with its Kickstarter campaign almost quadrupling its pledge aim of $5,000 with almost an entire month left to run.
Using a small electric engine, powered by just 5 AA batteries, whether your target is your arch nemesis or just a few cans lined up along a wall, the huge 672 rubber band capacity allows you to fire off 14 shots per second, at a range of up to 26 feet.
With plenty of time left to pledge – should you be unable to fight the desire to get your hands on one of your very own rubber band machine guns – the eleven different pledge options, and three stunning variations of gun design, should leave no home rubber-band-machine-gun-less this Christmas.
Zoom Info

geargent:

The Ultimate Weapon In Rubber Band Warfare

If somebody had asked you, yesterday, to name the top ten must-have items that your bachelor pad simply had to have, a rubber band machine gun probably wouldn’t have been on that list. Why? Because you didn’t know it existed. Now you’re going to regret laminating that wish-list, because your trusty Wingman is going to show you exactly why it needs changing.

Ingeniously designed and crafted by Alex Shpetniy & Brian Dinh, this fast-charging, easy-reload, 16-barrel, automatic machine gun is a certified fan favourite, with its Kickstarter campaign almost quadrupling its pledge aim of $5,000 with almost an entire month left to run.

Using a small electric engine, powered by just 5 AA batteries, whether your target is your arch nemesis or just a few cans lined up along a wall, the huge 672 rubber band capacity allows you to fire off 14 shots per second, at a range of up to 26 feet.

With plenty of time left to pledge – should you be unable to fight the desire to get your hands on one of your very own rubber band machine guns – the eleven different pledge options, and three stunning variations of gun design, should leave no home rubber-band-machine-gun-less this Christmas.